Around here, as in many adoptive families, holidays are hard work, especially the first few days of adjustment to the different routines. Joanna (7) and Charlotte (6) both have sensory issues caused by their early experiences: Joanna’s are primarily aural (oversensitivity to sound and a fear of loud noises), while Charlotte’s are mainly oral (she likes to chew things – toys, clothes, books – and is very fussy about food and… View Post

The children are with their grandparents for the weekend. We had a lie in followed by a breakfast of pancakes and coffee, and are now reading yesterday’s paper. Husband keeps dozing off on the sofa. Later we might go out for coffee or even lunch. It is quiet. It is blissful. No one has argued, no one has pestered me for anything, no one has left a trail of destruction… View Post

Sounds ridiculous. Looks simple. But this thing is magic. Yes, it’s just like the ‘fortune tellers’ we made as children, but with activities in. (If you need a quick set of instructions, there are some here.) I’ve chosen activities that our children can do without much intervention or set-up from me, for those ‘I’m bored and I don’t know what to do’ moments that happen about seventy times a day in… View Post

We are now 24 hours in to the summer holidays and things are more or less on track. The girls have now been with us for four Julys. We have established that Joanna in particular Does Not Like Them, and that the last day of the school year is especially hard for her as she says goodbye to her teachers. First year: Bit her nursery key worker and hit some other… View Post

I’ve written a piece for Standard Issue about Finding Dory. (And the editor kept my terrible puns in. Win.) On the same day last week, we had (a) an email from post-adoption support about the potential for the content of the film (separation from/reuniting with birth parents) to be decidedly unhelpful for adopted children, and (b) a leaflet home in the girls’ school bags about how wonderful Finding Dory is in connection with… View Post